One of those weeks

Irish-Japanese Fusion Blanket

Did you ever have one of those weeks, that feel really busy and tiring, on the go the whole time, yet feel at the end of it that nothing much has been accomplished? Well then, you know what this week has been like. It wasn’t bad, I got all sort of fiddly little tasks done, but it was somehow unsatisfactory, full of minor irritations. For example, my stashbuster Applecore Blanket (Frankie Brown), combining the best of Noro and Donegal Yarns (54 patches of each), is now in one piece. I had 2 balls of ancient single ply tweed in dark brown, one of which I used to crochet strips together and the other earmarked for the edging. The joining up went more smoothly than I’d dared hope: on wrong side ( slip st joining the thread between 2 garter st ridges on one patch and its equivalent on the other patch, chain 1), repeat all along the strip- it’s really quick and neat.

Strips of patches joined with crochet, Applecore Blanket

See those wiggly seams on the wrong side? Much more fun than sewing!

But then, just as I was feeling satisfied with what has been a really all-round enjoyable knit – frustration!  – that 2nd ball of dark brown has disappeared. Now I know this apartment is in a state of creative chaos (oh alright, pretty messy), but it’s also very small, and I’ve been searching to no avail, so that I’m beginning to consider hallucinations or early- onset Alzheimers’.

Noro and Donegal Yarns harmonising

I can still snuggle up and enjoy the colours without an edging, but I wanted to get just one project done and dusted! I’ve several others on the needles which need revision, or a very clear head, or lots more time, and this is the one  that was meant to be for pure straightforward enjoyment…. Aaargh, don’t mind me, I’m just cranky! I’m just going to fondle the original a bit more…

Stashbusting Apple core Blanket (Frankie Brown)

….mmmm, that’s better! The colours are even richer in real life, too. The sun actually shone for a while yesterday, so I nipped outside to take photos for you, but the sunlight had a slightly bleached effect on my woolly stained glass-style creation, so you’re not getting the full benefit. I think the Donegal and Noro yarns go so well together because the are each adventurous with colours- unexpected contrasts and combinations make them particularly lively and distinctive. You can always tell imitation Donegal tweed by the boring flecks that are added- a green yarn will have a light green and a dark green fleck, with maybe a bit of brown thrown in-ooh, how daring! My original green here has pink, purple, and turquoise, and is very pleasing to the eye without dazzling it…

By the way, I deliberately haven’t blocked or pressed this, cos I like the 3D undulations. I think they go well with the rugged outdoorsy texture. See the way some of the patches are stripey, cos they are made up of the last remnants of different balls (just like original patchwork quilts, where every scrap of precious fabric was used up)?

Close-up of crochet seams on WS of Donegal Tweed-Noro afghan

I like the “wrong ” side too. FYI, I wove in the ends of the knitted-together short seams as I went along, and I crocheted over the remaining yarn tails in the long crocheted seams, so that was pretty painless!

Now I’ve seen on my blog stats that quite a few people have been googling Dublin suppliers of Donegal Yarns/ Soft/Tweed/Studio Donegal/Kilcarra, so I thought I’d introduce one more source. This is Knit, The Constant Knitter and Winnie’s all have a selection, but Springwools also has cones for (very) large projects.

Springwools premises, Ballymount Road Lower, Dublin 12

Springwools is to be found on the edge of an industrial estate ( Lower Ballymount Road), near Walkinstown Roundabout (handy for buses from the city centre), in a modified warehouse.

Springwools entrance

It’s a lot roomier than it looks on the outside, and there is a lot of space inside for essentially a bit of everything…

Springwools Open sign

I really like this sign.

Large assortment of yarn on cones, Springwools

I really caught them at a bad time: to be fair, the shelves are usually a lot more orderly, but on Saturdays the ravening hordes generally descend on the place and stir it up quite a bit, as you can see. This is where I acquired the cone of fine mohair blend for my Froth cape, and some excellent quality Yeoman 4-ply (stunning colours!) for assorted hard-wearing garments for my DS.

Donegal tweed (original), Aran and sportweight, Springwools

And here there is space to stock a selection of Donegal (tweed) Yarns on the cone, which work out at good value if you’re planning a big project, or sharing with a friend.

Donegal Yarns, 2kg Aran weight

For example, I got one of these 2kg Aran weight cones in purple for 80 Euros, which was enough for my version of the Susie Hoodie (Mandy Moore, More Big Girl Knits) and for a goodly part of my Windmill Blanket (Curve of Pursuit, Susan Ashforth), both of which I’ve already shown you.

Donegal Tweed single ply, 1kg cones, Springwools

Then there are the 1kg single-ply cones (100% merino), for 50 Euros: one of these (the silver grey) was enough for my welted coat, a shawl, and I still have some in my stash for a rainy day, so that was a good investment. This stuff is “in oil”- I think that makes it suitable for machine knitting, too, but don’t quote me- that is definitely not my area of expertise (imagine letting a machine have all the fun)! Anyway, it smells “sheepy”, which takes me straight back to childhood summer holidays in Donegal and adds an extra dimension of enjoyment to knitting for me. The smell disappears after soaking or washing, though. This yarn (washed) is also marketed in balls as Lang Yarns “Donegal”- I’ve no idea who supplies it though.

Remember my “Little’n’Large” versions of Yuko Nakamura’s slippers? Well, I have been wearing mine almost non-stop since I finished them, even to bed on cold nights, so they were in need of some TLC, even though I’d mixed a synthetic -mix yarn into the soles. I was invited to lunch in Winnie’s on Friday by GF, so I knit little synthetic-only patches during the bus journey, and sewed them on when I got home.

Patched slippers (Patt Yuko Nakamura)

GF, by the way, stands either for GodFather ( he’s DS’s) or Good Friend (to both of us)- he’s the one who gave me access to the Moon rocks (lecturer at UCD). He likes to take me out to lunch and catch up on his godson’s progress, and supports my yarn diet by treating me to a zero-calorie, high-in-fibre woolly “dessert”- this time it was some more Drops Delight for my Happy Blanket (Camilla Gugenheim), which is growing slowly but surely:

Happy Blanket, Camilla Gugenheim

I started into the other Donegal stashbuster blanket I’ve dreamed up, but it turns out I haven’t got enough of some of the colours to do  it the way I’d planned, so that has to be ripped back and started again. Like I said, it’s been one of those weeks….

Mind you, knitting in the school is starting to gather momentum, as at least some parents are quite supportive. The “boys don’t knit” attitude is stamped into some of the kids though, it’s sad that such limitations are being placed on them at such an early age by their upbringing. However, their class teacher is very keen on equal opportunities for all her students, too, so we’re soldiering on!

It’s a sure sign that it’s time to stop and take a deep breath, when I unearth an old project that I’ve never found time to block- the Orchid Thief shawlette (Ysolda Teague). This turned up when I was searching for that runaway?/imagined? ball of dark brown tweed. At the moment it’s a perfect example of how most lace looks like a dog’s dinner before it’s blocked, but it’s a pretty little pattern and the Lang sock yarn is very soft, so I’ll block it as soon as I can find/uncover enough clear floorspace.

Orchid Thief pre-blocking (Ysolde Teague), Lang sock yarn

But don’t hold your breath!

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20 thoughts on “One of those weeks

  1. I understand the pain of losing a ball, the same thing happened to me when I lost the last ball of yarn to finish my holiday project. After turning the house upside down I found it in a pocket in my suitcase in the loft. Grr!

  2. Your work is truly a piece of art and I love your yarn shop. Happy knitting 🙂

  3. It’s too funny that even when you’re trying to sound cranky and all bothered that you still sound chipper! Must be because you’re talking about something you enjoy so much – your knitting. I love these blankies (sorry, carry-over from when the kids were little) – what a great way to use up all that precious wonderful yarn!
    Ah, well, onto the next week, right Pauline? Maybe this will be the one that brings satisfaction…
    and that missing ball of yarn!
    (good luck)
    Sue

      • Me, too – although my kids have forced me to stop calling their shirts – top-a-loppies and pants – pantaloonies. How sad is that? Still, my two dogs seem to like baby talk. McKenna asked me the other day why I add a “y” when I speak to Maggie and Bella. In reply, I turned to Maggie and said, “Because you likey it, don’t you? Walkys and stickys and ballys?” Maggie thumped her tail at every word.

  4. The ‘stashbuster’ blanket is breathtaking!
    I hope you have some more luck with teaching the boys to knit – school children sometimes seem to accept gender cliches as carved-in-stone fact! Perhaps you need a adult male volunteer to show them it’s possible?

  5. Your stashbuster blanket is amazing! I love all the tweedy colours.
    And I hadn’t realised that Donegal tweeds came in so many colours; now there really is no excuse for me not to try some.

  6. The blanket looks great!l I wove with the Donegal tweed, and I love that sleepy smell. Some part of me thinks all wool yarn should smell like that. I hope you find the missing yarn. I think it going missing proves the existence of wormholes to other dimensions. Things get sucked into the wormhole and disappear. Where and how else would a pair of shoes that I wore every day disappear?!?

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